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Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder w/ FASD-CAN Chairperson Leigh Henderson,  Clinical Neuropsychologist and Clinical Director of the FASD Centre Aotearoa Dr Valerie McGinn, Byron, and Kick Back Make Change Leader Aaron Hendry: Monday 6 May, 2024

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder w/ FASD-CAN Chairperson Leigh Henderson,  Clinical Neuropsychologist and Clinical Director of the FASD Centre Aotearoa Dr Valerie McGinn, Byron, and Kick Back Make Change Leader Aaron Hendry: Monday 6 May, 2024

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder w/ FASD-CAN Chairperson Leigh Henderson,  Clinical Neuropsychologist and Clinical Director of the FASD Centre Aotearoa Dr Valerie McGinn, Byron, and Kick Back Make Change Leader Aaron Hendry: Monday 6 May, 2024 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder w/ FASD-CAN Chairperson Leigh Henderson,  Clinical Neuropsychologist and Clinical Director of the FASD Centre Aotearoa Dr Valerie McGinn, Byron, and Kick Back Make Change Leader Aaron Hendry: Monday 6 May, 2024, 30.11 MB
Monday, May 6, 2024

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is a neural-disability caused by prenatal alcohol exposure which can affect memory, intellectual ability, and emotional regulation.

The Ministry of Health estimates that between three to five percent of the population in Aotearoa are affected by FASD, with around 1800 to 3000 babies being born with FASD each year.

The government has recently announced it will be establishing new guidelines to help health professionals diagnose FASD, a programme to support families, and launching a FASD prevention campaign.

First, News and Editorial Director, Jessica Hopkins, spoke to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Care Action Network (FASD-CAN) Chairperson, Leigh Henderson. FASD-CAN is a non-profit, incorporated society made up of parents, caregivers, extended whānau and professionals. She spoke to Henderson about how the government can better support those with FASD.She started off the interview asking Henderson what difference she believes the government’s proposed initiatives will make?

She also spoke to Clinical Neuropsychologist and Clinical Director of the FASD Centre Aotearoa, Dr Valerie McGinn. The FASD Centre Aotearoa assesses and helps with the management of children, young people, and adults with FASD. She started off the interview asking for her thoughts on the government’s announcement. 

To hear from a person with FASD, she spoke to Byron, a young adult with FASD, about his experience and what support he would like to see from the government.

And she spoke to leader of Kick Back Make Change, a non-profit organisation serving rangatahi experiencing homelessness, about support needed for young people experiencing homelessness who have disabilities including FASD.