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The Wire with Lachlan Balfour

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The Wire with Lisa: Wednesday 5th, 2018

The Wire with Lisa: Wednesday 5th, 2018 The Wire with Lisa: Wednesday 5th, 2018, 107.08 MB
Wed 5 Sep 2018

On Dear Science this week, AUT professor Marcus Jones talks about an Internation Space Station air leak, people wanting to put an end to daylight saving, and why it's so hard to find a good substitute for salt. 

Producer Darashpreet Johal talks to Kate McIntyre from People Against Prisons Aotearoa about solitary confinement eat Whanganui prison. 

A recent survey containing data on the usefulness of courses is being blocked by university, which claim the results are not trustworthy.Tuwhenuaroa Natanahira talks to Brendan Keylly, Deputy Chief Executive of Information at the Tertiary Education Commission, who defends the survey. 

And for Wire Worry Week, Lisa Boudet looks at the differences between an animal right's and an animal welfare's approach to human interactions with animals, and talks to SAFE (Save Animals From Exploitation)'s corporate campaigner Jennifer Dutton.  

 

Worry Week: One Billion (native?) Trees I/V w/ Paul Michael of Fern Factor: September 4, 2018

Worry Week: One Billion (native?) Trees I/V w/ Paul Michael of Fern Factor: September 4, 2018 Worry Week: One Billion (native?) Trees I/V w/ Paul Michael of Fern Factor: September 4, 2018, 28.66 MB
Tue 4 Sep 2018

The government has committed to planting One Billion Trees, a big number of that is planned to be native trees. Newsroom did a story on this and Lillian Hanly wanted to follow up with it because native trees take a bit longer to germinate than exotic trees, the process is more complicated she says. So for the government to say this will happen, well, it may not be as simple as that. Different native seeds take different times to germinate for example, and if you miss the specific time to clip that seed well you have to wait for the next year to do it again. Not to mention the capital needed to start this process, the soil, the tools, the labour involved. You don’t get anything back from that until after you have the crop to sell. Despite this complicated process, native trees are really really important. So we need to make sure the support is there to see it through. Paul Michael works at Fern Factor, a specialist fern factory. Lillian spoke to him about the Project, how exactly it could get done and why it should get done. Lillian started by asking his reaction to the announcement of the Billion Trees Project.

During Lillian's research, she got in touch with the Ministry of Primary Industries who are spearheading the project. There was no time to get audio, but they did provide her with this information:

Firstly, a link to the latest update.

But essentially, the information explained that the target for those one billion trees to be planted would be by 2027. "The Government’s role is as an enabler – supporting increased planting of a wide range of both native and exotic species to create these benefits for all New Zealanders. The commercial forestry sector is projected to plant more than half a billion trees in the next 10 years, while private landowners, government agencies, NGOs, Maori landowners, regional councils, nurseries and the private sector are the key to planting the rest." 

The government is looking at a broad range of both exotic and native species, as well as focusing on the "right trees in the right place, for the right purpose" - this would be similar to 'eco sourcing' as discussed in the interview.

"To date, Cabinet has approved $245 million from the PGF to kick-start the programme. This provides for up to 24 million extra trees planted through Crown Forestry joint ventures with landowners, together with a significant increase in funding for the Hill Country Erosion programme to support regional council’s tree planting initiatives.

On top of this, Cabinet has set aside a further $240 million from the Provincial Growth Fund to create two new incentive packages in the form of a new grants scheme and a new partnership fund. This includes $118 million for the grants scheme, $120 million for the partnership fund, on top of $21.9 million allocated for projects already approved through the PGF.

Benefits include indigenous regeneration, planting for water quality or erosion, sustainable employment, and more resilient landscapes.The main aim of these new incentive schemes is to help lower the barriers currently faced by landowners and to improve the choices they have."

Looking forwards, we will see 

Looking forwards, "across the whole programme, we’re expecting up to 260 million trees to be planted over the next three seasons. This includes approximately 150 million from existing commercial planting and replanting, 30 million from existing native planting, and 80 million from government investment in joint ventures and the new grants fund."

Photo credit: RadioNZ

Worry Week: 1080 drop over the Hunua Ranges w/ Kevin Hague and Tina Ngata

Worry Week: 1080 drop over the Hunua Ranges w/ Kevin Hague and Tina Ngata Worry Week: 1080 drop over the Hunua Ranges w/ Kevin Hague and Tina Ngata, 7.01 MB
Tue 4 Sep 2018

Auckland Council is planning an aerial drop of 1080 poison over the Hunua Ranges in southeast Auckland.  This is the second 1080 operation on the Hunua Ranges, with the last one in 2015. Justin talked to Forest and Bird spokesperson Kevin Hague on the effects of the drop, and researcher Tina Ngata on why some people oppose using 1080.

International News With Conor: September 4th, 2018

International News With Conor: September 4th, 2018 International News With Conor: September 4th, 2018, 25.25 MB
Tue 4 Sep 2018

This week in International News, Conor looks at the current situation in Northern Ireland. We explore sectarianism, the current political deadlock, identity and the future of a post-Brexit Northern Ireland

The Wire with Lillian: September 4, 2018

The Wire with Lillian: September 4, 2018 The Wire with Lillian: September 4, 2018, 111.6 MB
Tue 4 Sep 2018

On The Wire today, Paul Michael from the Fern Factor talks us through the commitment required to see out the Billion Trees project in terms of native trees

This week on the Greendesk, we talk with exGreen MP Nandor Tanczos about the YES campaign with the Cannabis Referendum Coalition.

Justin Wong talks to Kevin Hague from Forest and Bird and researcher Tina Ngata about an Auckland Council 1080 drop over the Hunua Ranges.

And finally, Conor Knell describes the situation in Northern Ireland and the recent issues around Brexit, sectarianism, identity and the power sharing collapse.

Sticking our heads in the sand - sand mining in New Zealand: September 3, 2018

Sticking our heads in the sand - sand mining in New Zealand: September 3, 2018 Sticking our heads in the sand - sand mining in New Zealand: September 3, 2018, 6.2 MB
Mon 3 Sep 2018

Earlier this year Trans-Tasman Resources Ltd applied for resource consent to mine the seabed off Taranaki. Their application was denied after a number of protestors brought legal action against the decision. Dan speaks with Cindy Baxter, a spokesperson for Kiwis Against Seabed Mining, one of the groups which campaigned against the resource consent.

The Wire with Lachlan: September 3, 2018

The Wire with Lachlan: September 3, 2018 The Wire with Lachlan: September 3, 2018, 103.4 MB
Mon 3 Sep 2018

On the Wire, James Shaw joins us to discuss the waka jumping bill and youth mental health. Dan speaks with Cindy Baxter about sand mining in Aotearoa. Southern Cross talks the APcific Forum, youth unemployment in the Solomon Islands and the life of a Filipino migrant. Finally, Damian gives us a report on Nigel Farage who is due to speak in New Zeland tomorrow.

The Wire with Laura: Friday August 31st, 2018

The Wire with Laura: Friday August 31st, 2018 The Wire with Laura: Friday August 31st, 2018, 103.86 MB
Fri 31 Aug 2018

Publish or Perish I/V with Mark Bolland

Faulty Data I/V with Mark Bolland Faulty Data I/V with Mark Bolland, 14.64 MB
Fri 31 Aug 2018

Three academics at the University of Auckland have been involved in the important uncovering of fraudulant data within the research field of osteoperosis. Jenn Tamati spoke to one of them, associate Professor at the UoA Mark Bolland, on the importance and implications of this research and data in general.