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The Wire with Jemima Huston

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Mental Health Awareness Week 2021 w/ the Mental Health Foundation: September 28, 2021

Mental Health Awareness Week 2021 w/ the Mental Health Foundation: September 28, 2021 Mental Health Awareness Week 2021 w/ the Mental Health Foundation: September 28, 2021, 10.96 MB
Tue 28 Sep 2021

This week is Mental Health Awareness Week, Monday 27 September until Sunday 3 October. The theme this year is "Take Time to Kōrero" and the Mental Health Foundation, who are leading the campaign, wants people to take a little time to connect with loved ones and have open conversations about wellbeing. News and Editorial Director Jemima Huston speaks with Mental Health Foundation Chief Executive Shaun Robinson about the plan for the week. With Auckland still being in Alert Level 3, they also discuss the feeling of lockdown fatigue and how people can balance supporting their own wellbeing and supporting others during this time. 

If you are looking to get involved with some of the initatives of Mental Health Awareness week, check out the website!

The Infinite and the Finite Game: Activism as Entertainment?: September 28, 2021

The Infinite and the Finite Game: Activism as Entertainment?: September 28, 2021 The Infinite and the Finite Game: Activism as Entertainment?: September 28, 2021, 11.25 MB
Tue 28 Sep 2021

This week, Stella and Isla are inspired by the recent controversy surrounding the proposed CBS show 'The Activist', in which contestants are pitted against each other to achieve the greatest amount of change. They interview community psychologist Dr Niki Harré about why public outcry might have been so ferocious, and her project that discusses the psychology of environmental activism, The Infinite Game.

Meningococcal Vaccinations w/ Andrea Brady: Sep 27, 2021.

Meningococcal Vaccinations w/ Andrea Brady: Sep 27, 2021 Meningococcal Vaccinations w/ Andrea Brady: Sep 27, 2021, 8.79 MB
Mon 27 Sep 2021

Health experts have urged the government to do more to vaccinate young people against the meningococcal disease. In 2019, 139 people in New Zealand contracted the disease, with ten people dying from it. 

Louis spoke to the Meningitis Foundation's Andrea Brady to chat about meningococcal and what further support the government needs to offer. 

The Wire with Jessica: September 27, 2021

The Wire with Jessica: September 27, 2021 The Wire with Jessica: September 27, 2021, 101.92 MB
Mon 27 Sep 2021

This week on the show, Jessica Hopkins speaks to Te Rito Maioha Early Childhood New Zealand Chief Executive, Kathy Wolfe about pay parity issues for early childhood teachers and kaiako.

She also interviews Emily Muli from Pasifika Futures on their work supporting Pasiifka young people during COVID-19.

Producer Louis Macalister talks to The Meningitis Foundation’s Andrea Brady about vaccinating young people against the meningococcal disease.

He also speaks to Age Concern New Zealand’s Stephanie Clare about ageism and how it impacts older people.

International Day of Older Persons w/ Stephanie Clare: Sep 27, 2021.

International Day of Older Persons w/ Stephanie Clare: Sep 27, 2021. , 10.59 MB
Mon 27 Sep 2021

The International Day of Older Persons will be celebrated across the world this Friday. According to Age Concern New Zealand, it is an important day to appreciate older people and to highlight issues of ageism. 

Louis was joined by Age Concern New Zealand's Stephanie Clare to talk about the day, ageism, and how it impacts older people. 

Prehistoric Tsunamis in Auckland: September 24, 2021

Prehistoric Tsunamis in Auckland: September 24, 2021 Prehistoric Tsunamis in Auckland: September 24, 2021, 9.16 MB
Fri 24 Sep 2021

New research has mapped out Tāmaki Makarau's history of tsunamis over thousands of years.

Noah Ferguson-Dudding spoke to one of the researchers involved, Kate Clark from GNS Science, about the implications of the study.

The Friday Wire: September 24, 2021

The Friday Wire: September 24, 2021 The Friday Wire: September 24, 2021, 99.82 MB
Fri 24 Sep 2021

The Wire keeps coming from home through level 3:

Noah speaks to National MP Christopher Luxon about Covid and National's popularity, and Kate Clark about prehistoric tsunamis.

Ilena speaks to Shirley Waru about the Respect Ōtāhuhu movement, and Councillor Shane Henderson on Auckland's return to Level 3.

All presented by Jemima in the studio.

City Counselling w/ Shane Henderson: September 24, 2021

City Counselling w/ Shane Henderson: September 24, 2021 City Counselling w/ Shane Henderson: September 24, 2021, 15.17 MB
Fri 24 Sep 2021

This week, Ilena and Shane talk about what moving into level three means for Auckland, and in particular, how level 3 does not mean ‘level free’. They talk about varying levels of compliance and enforcement in different suburbs and how we can ‘support local’ safely during this time. 

They also addressed the felling of hundreds of non-native trees at Ōtāhuhu, following up on Ilena’s previous conversation with Shirley Waru. Shane outlined the scope of Auckland Council’s influence on the matter, and gave insight into the consultation process.

 

Disclaimer:

After the interview with Shane, Shirley Waru, the organiser of Protect Mt Richmond/Ōtāhuhu, had some clarifications on some of Cr. Henderson's points:

  • Cr. Henderson implied that Auckland Council has no say in Tupuna Maunga Authority’s work. He did not mention that the Authority is a co-governance organisation. It has six iwi representatives and six Auckland Council representatives (who, under the Treaty settlement legislation are there to represent “all the people of Auckland”). The Authority is a ratepayer-funded entity. Every year, Auckland Council’s governing body considers the Authority’s annual operational plan and votes on the budget. In other words, Auckland Council does have some say on what the Authority does.
  • He said that the public were consulted about the tree removal in both the Authority’s 2016 integrated management plan consultations and operational plan consultations. The Authority never specifically consulted about its intentions to remove all the exotic trees from all of Auckland’s maunga. The Authority’s chairman admits this in a Māori TV interview earlier this year:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDrCMAhL4tk&list=PLvwPLhmfEWgk8wZyFXdCLKV871TFlO1FN&index=4. The Authority has consulted in recent years on its operational plan, but, on the whole, ignored public input. 
  • Cr. Henderson said that only some of the exotic trees will be removed from Mt Richmond. Yes, not all exotic trees will be removed under this particular resource consent, but supporting documentation clearly shows they intend to remove all of them in time. Protect Mt Richmond/Ōtāhuhu believes they split the removal process in two so as to get a non-notified resource consent through.
  • Cr. Henderson also says that tens of thousands of native plants are being planted in exotic trees' places. However, this is misleading: these are mostly small plants like flaxes, grasses and shrubs and not tree species, meaning that places that previously had tree cover would look very bare, covered with small plants rather than trees. 
     


 

Respect Mt Richmond/Ōtāhuhu w/ Shirley Waru: September 24, 2021

Respect Mt Richmond/Ōtāhuhu w/ Shirley Waru: September 24, 2021 Respect Mt Richmond/Ōtāhuhu w/ Shirley Waru: September 24, 2021, 11.98 MB
Fri 24 Sep 2021

This morning, Ilena spoke to Shirley Waru, leader of the grassroots group ‘Respect Mt Richmond/Ōtāhuhu’, about the planned felling of hundreds of exotic trees on the maunga.

Auckland Council recently issued a non-notified resource consent to allow Tūpuna Maunga Authority to fell hundreds of exotic trees there. The current resource consent is for felling 278 of the maunga’s 443 exotic trees, but the Authority intends to fell all exotics in time – which comprises 75% of the maunga’s entire tree cover. The plan is to replace these exotic trees with native plants, but, according to Shirley, this could mean that swathes of forest could simply be replaced by low-lying flax and shrubs, rather than comparable native trees. Similar plans are happening around Auckland’s volcanic cones, and there has already been an occupation at Mt Albert/Owairaka. 

Shirley talks about her engagement with the issue, what alternatives she proposes and why this felling should be reconsidered.

 

The Porirua Restoration Project w Dr. Aroha Spinks - September 23rd, 2021

The Porirua Restoration Project w Dr. Aroha Spinks - September 23rd, 2021 Aroha Spinks - September 23rd, 2021, 10.26 MB
Thu 23 Sep 2021

WWF-NZ have teamed up with six organisations, Iwi, and council for a restoration project on the Poririua Stream. Conor speaks to the WWF-NZ Environmental Science Director Dr. Aroha Spinks about the project, it's cultural significance, and the future of this project and others.