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The Wire with Lillian Hanly

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The Wire with Lillian: Wednesday 24th January, 2018

Wednesday Wire Wednesday Wire, 105.81 MB
Wed 24 Jan 2018

On the Wednesday Wire today,

Allan Blackman brings us Dear Science with a discussion of rats and the plague, the banning of pesticides that are harmful to bees and fungi that might help to heal concrete.

Tracey Martin speaks to us about how it will work when Winston Peters takes over as acting Prime Minister, what the official Oranga Tamariki name change actually means in regards to a change in the way things are done, and 'education' under her portfolios as part of our Wire's Worry Week.

Michael Horowitz, a visiting academic from the Atenisi Institute in Tonga talks to Lillian Hanly about his upcoming talk, The Possible Indictment of Trump: the Legal Details.

Marianne Elliot from Action Station talks to Will Parsonson about the government's mental health inquiry and how New Zealand can change the way it addresses mental health.

Dear Science: Rats, Bees and Fungi

Dear Science: Rats, Bees and Fungi Dear Science: Rats, Bees and Fungi, 30.99 MB
Wed 24 Jan 2018

On todays Dear Science with AUT's Allan Blackman, we talk about how rats maybe arent to blame for the black plague. We delve into the world of nicotine based pesticides and how Bunnings has banned them to stop the needless death of bees. Finally we talk about a new type of concrete that can be crossed with fungi to create self repairing materials for infrastructure... Now thats some cool science

The Possible Indictment of the Trump Campaign: The Legal Details

Michael Horowitz on Trump's Legal Fumbles Michael Horowitz on Trump's Legal Fumbles, 10.31 MB
Wed 24 Jan 2018

Michael Horowitz is the Dean of the Atenisi Institute in the Kingdom of Tonga. His background is in political and social science before completing an interdisciplinary phd from the college of public affairs at portland state university. He has been in Tonga for 22 years now, and has held summer residencies at all the major universities in New Zealand. Currently he is visiting AUT university as part of a joint architectural project for a new building on one of the Atenisi campuses. Next week however, he will be presenting a discussion on the Possible Indictment of the Trump Campaign, and outlining the legal details. He came into bFM this morning for a chat with Lillian Hanly who started by asking what the talk was about.

The talk is being held at AUT University on Tuesday the 30th January at 12pm, in room WF214 at the AUT Business School. 

Photo credit: USA Today

Oxfam: A new billionaire every two days

Oxfam: A new billionaire every two days Oxfam: A new billionaire every two days, 28.15 MB
Tue 23 Jan 2018

“Reward Work Not Wealth”, that is the title of Oxfam’s newest wealth and inequality report.

According to the report, 82% of the wealth generated last year went to the richest one percent of the global population, while the 3.7 billion people who make up the poorest half got nothing.

Oxfam NZ adds that the situation in New Zealand isn't much better: Of the wealth created last year, the richest 1% own 28%, while the poorest 30% of the population received less than 1%.

Reuben McLaren spoke to Rachael Le Mesurier to find out more.

The Wire with Reuben: Tuesday 23rd January

The Wire with Reuben: Tuesday 23rd January The Wire with Reuben: Tuesday 23rd January , 110.05 MB
Tue 23 Jan 2018

Reuben hosts The Wire with young blood Mark Casson lending a hand.

Firstly,  a new report by Oxfam about the growing gap between rich and poor has been released, Reuben speaks to Oxfam New Zealand CEO Rachael Le Mesurier to find out more.

On the Green Desk, Conor Mercer learns about seismic testing in the Māui's dolphin habitat, off the coast of the Taranaki.

Discussions about Paul Moon's new book continue, now with Mike Hosking even weighing in yesterday. We hear more from Lillian Hanly's report on Te Reo.

Producer Mark Casson speaks to Anthony Hawke from Hapai Te Hauora about the new Instant Kiwi app and the risks of gambling.

Instant Kiwi app: Gambling with addiction?

Instant Kiwi app: Gambling with addiction? Instant Kiwi app: Gambling with addiction?, 21.7 MB
Tue 23 Jan 2018

Addiction and gambling has always been a major problem in society, but what happens when gambling is normalised in the online sphere?

Lotto New Zealand have recently launched an add-on to their gambling app, allowing them to sell Instant Kiwi products to consumers. Critics argue, apps like this are problematic, as gambling becomes hugely accessible at all times.

Mark Casson speaks to Anthony Hawke, from Hapai Te Hauora about the risks of online gambling.

The Realm of New Zealand in the 21st Century

The Realm of New Zealand in the 21st Century The Realm of New Zealand in the 21st Century , 13.23 MB
Mon 22 Jan 2018

A new book looking into the role of the sovereign, governor-general, and crown in New Zealand has been published. This Realm of New Zealand is a comprehensive account of how the Queen, governor-general, and the Crown interact with our democratically elected leaders under New Zealand’s unwritten constitution. The authors also examine some of the key issues to be considered should NZ become a republic. Sam Smith spoke to the book’s co-author Professor Janet McLean. 

A new year, an ongoing battle to save Ihumatao.

A new year, an ongoing battle to save Ihumatao. , 7.92 MB
Mon 22 Jan 2018

The campaign to save sacred land at Ihumatao in Mangere is moving to the environment court. SOUL decided to take legal action against Heritage New Zealand after they approved Fletcher Building application to destroy wahi tapu and archaeological sites on the land marked for development. No settlement was reached and the case is now moving to the environment court. No sort of development can occur on the whenua until the environment court process is settled. Sam Smith spoke to SOUL spokesperson Pania Newton about the latest developments.

 

The problem with getting news on Facebook

The problem with getting news on Facebook The problem with getting news on Facebook, 25.66 MB
Mon 22 Jan 2018

Over the past few months, Facebook has come under fire for its role in presenting news to the public. There’s been criticism that it creates a bubble of information that’s curated by algorithms based on user’s values. This has caused issues in users receiving potentially false but self-affirming information, causing problems in news consumption worldwide.
Joel spoke to Dr Neal Curtis, a published author, media theorist and professor at Auckland University, and News Director Lillian Hanley about this.

The Wire with Joel: Monday 22nd January, 2018

The Wire with Joel: Monday 22nd January, 2018 The Wire with Joel: Monday 22nd January, 2018, 104.89 MB
Mon 22 Jan 2018

Joel Thomas hosts The Wire with Sam Smith as producer in which:

We hear from Duncan Grieve who’s stepping down as editor of The Spinoff about why he’s making this decision and the background of the organisation.

We hear from University of Auckland Professor Janet McLean about a new book she has co-authored on the role and place of the Crown and Sovereign in New Zealand.

We get response to the controversial comments about Te Reo from Paul Moon.

We talk to Dr. Neal Curtis about how social media works as an education an information platform and what issues arise out of this model.

And we check in with SOUL to get the latest on the battle to save Ihumatao from development.