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Justin's Extra International Desk: France and the Sahel: 5th December 2019

Justin's Extra International Desk: France and the Sahel: 5th December 2019 Justin's Extra International Desk: France and the Sahel: 5th December 2019, 40.16 MB
Thu 5 Dec 2019

Justin talks to security analyst Paul Buchannan about the reasons why France intervened in West Africa, and why Paris is less likely to face a similar situation in the Sahel as the US faced in Afghanistan and Iraq.

The Wire with Stewart: December 5, 2019

The Wire with Stewart: December 5, 2019 The Wire with Stewart: December 5, 2019, 102.55 MB
Thu 5 Dec 2019

Stewart's back and he forgot a sting! It could be chaos. 

This week on the show: 

  • Minister Andrew Little wraps up a massive political week. Foreign donations are banned and cannabis is a step closer to being legalised.
  • Then, international desk. Justin tells us about the deaths of 13 French soldiers in an accident in Mali. What is France doing in West Africa and why.
  • After that, Neighbourhood Watch is back for another week. Our correspondent Zoe wraps the latest Aussie politics. 
  • And finally, a live interview with the Director of the Immunisation Advisory Centre at the University of Auckland, Dr Nikki Turner, about New Zealand’s role in the measles crisis in Samoa.

All that plus poll position, listener texts and quality conversation. Join Stewart Sowman-Lund and producers Mary-Margaret and Justin on The Thursday Wire.

'Blood phosphate' from Western Sahara - Part IIII - Homegrown Solutions: December 4, 2019

'Blood phosphate' from Western Sahara - Part IIII - Homegrown Solutions: December 4, 2019 'Blood phosphate' from Western Sahara - Part IIII - Homegrown Solutions: December 4, 2019, 33.27 MB
Wed 4 Dec 2019

Lillian Hanly is looking into the importing of what has been called 'blood phospate' from Western Sahara, occupied by Morocco. There have been three parts broadcast already, this is the fourth. So, to recap a little:

Around 170,000 Saharawi people were forced out of their own land when Morocco invaded in 1975, today they live as refugees separated by a constructed wall and littered with mines. Western Sahara is rich in resources, and it is understood Morocco is taking advantage of this. One particular resource that is being mined without the consent of the Saharawi people is phosphate. Two of the three remaining companies in the world to buy this disputed phosphate from Morocco are NZ companies. Australia, Canada, America - all have pulled out of this trade in the hope that the referendum, called for in 1991, can take place. So the Saharawi people can choose their independece. in Part IIII we hear from two different people in Aotearoa with solutions as to how we could use less phosphate - and therefore not rely on a trade that extracts the resource from a country where human rights abuses are taking place.

 

Kay Baxter is from the Koanga Institute. They have long worked to save heritage food plants, including vegetable seeds and fruit trees as well as being leading practitioners, researchers and teachers of bio-intensive gardening and nutrient dense food production. Now, they are also encouraging a shift to 'regenerative' farming, rather than 'degenerative' - a process which requires major nourishment of soil through fertiliser products. You can find some simple explainers on regeneration here. Kay indicates that pastoral farming has had a huge effect on the way the eco system is connected, leading to poor soil health.

Clare Bradley is the research co-ordinator at Agrisea, a company that works with seaweed to provide nutrients to the agriculture sector. When Lillian first contacted Agrisea, Clare said "farmers in NZ are being oversold Phosphorous products, in-fact over 50% of NZ Dairy Farms tested are over the “target range” for Olsen P (a measurement of plant available P)". So, in actual fact, we might not even need to be important that much phosphate? One of the reasons given by one of the NZ companies that does so was that NZ requires so much phosphate it is harder to source it from places other than Morocco/ Western Sahara - because theirs is the largest supply in the world. Lillian wanted to understand how seaweed could act as a supplement, as well as what other benefits seaweed brings to the world. 

Both Kay and Clare disagree with the sourcing of phosphate from Morocco, but also see the solutions to our ever worsening environmental and climate issues in more research, and the understanding of how our ecology worked before the links were broken. Lillian spoke with both of them to understand the movement that is very much occuring of its own accord to shift away from this reliance on phosphate. 

 

This is Part IIII in a series, you can listen to the others here:

Part I

Part II

Part III

 

Photo credit: Medium

'Blood phosphate' from Western Sahara - Part IIII full I/V w/ Kay Baxter from Koanga Institute: December 4, 2019

'Blood phosphate' from Western Sahara - Part IIII full I/V w/ Kay Baxter from Koanga Institute: December 4, 2019 'Blood phosphate' from Western Sahara - Part IIII full I/V w/ Kay Baxter from Koanga Institute: December 4, 2019, 56.91 MB
Wed 4 Dec 2019

Lillian Hanly is looking into the importing of what has been called 'blood phospate' from Western Sahara, occupied by Morocco. There have been three parts broadcast already, the fourth focuses on Home Solutions. That report interviews Kay Baxter from the Koanga Institute and Clare Bradley from Agrisea. Firstly, to recap a little:

Around 170,000 Saharawi people were forced out of their own land when Morocco invaded in 1975, today they live as refugees separated by a constructed wall and littered with mines. Western Sahara is rich in resources, and it is understood Morocco is taking advantage of this. One particular resource that is being mined without the consent of the Saharawi people is phosphate. Two of the three remaining companies in the world to buy this disputed phosphate from Morocco are NZ companies. Australia, Canada, America - all have pulled out of this trade in the hope that the referendum, called for in 1991, can take place. So the Saharawi people can choose their independece. in Part IIII we hear from two different people in Aotearoa with solutions as to how we could use less phosphate - and therefore not rely on a trade that extracts the resource from a country where human rights abuses are taking place.

Kay Baxter is from the Koanga Institute. They have long worked to save heritage food plants, including vegetable seeds and fruit trees as well as being leading practitioners, researchers and teachers of bio-intensive gardening and nutrient dense food production. Now, they are also encouraging a shift to 'regenerative' farming, rather than 'degenerative' - a process which requires major nourishment of soil through fertiliser products. You can find some simple explainers on regeneration here. Kay indicates that pastoral farming has had a huge effect on the way the eco system is connected, leading to poor soil health.

Clare Bradley is the research co-ordinator at Agrisea, a company that works with seaweed to provide nutrients to the agriculture sector. When Lillian first contacted Agrisea, Clare said "farmers in NZ are being oversold Phosphorous products, in-fact over 50% of NZ Dairy Farms tested are over the “target range” for Olsen P (a measurement of plant available P)". So, in actual fact, we might not even need to be important that much phosphate? One of the reasons given by one of the NZ companies that does so was that NZ requires so much phosphate it is harder to source it from places other than Morocco/ Western Sahara - because theirs is the largest supply in the world. Lillian wanted to understand how seaweed could act as a supplement, as well as what other benefits seaweed brings to the world. 

Both Kay and Clare disagree with the sourcing of phosphate from Morocco, but also see the solutions to our ever worsening environmental and climate issues in more research, and the understanding of how our ecology worked before the links were broken. Lillian spoke with both of them to understand the movement that is very much occuring of its own accord to shift away from this reliance on phosphate. 

This is Kay's full interview. 

 

To find the other parts in the series, you can listen to them here:

Part I

Part II

Part III

'Blood phosphate' from Western Sahara - Part IIII full I/V w/ Clare Bradley from Agrisea: December 4, 2019

'Blood phosphate' from Western Sahara - Part IIII full I/V w/ Clare Bradley from Agrisea: December 4, 2019 'Blood phosphate' from Western Sahara - Part IIII full I/V w/ Clare Bradley from Agrisea: December 4, 2019, 19.13 MB
Wed 4 Dec 2019

Lillian Hanly is looking into the importing of what has been called 'blood phospate' from Western Sahara, occupied by Morocco. There have been three parts broadcast already, the fourth focuses on Home Solutions. That report interviews Kay Baxter from the Koanga Institute and Clare Bradley from Agrisea. Firstly, to recap a little:

Around 170,000 Saharawi people were forced out of their own land when Morocco invaded in 1975, today they live as refugees separated by a constructed wall and littered with mines. Western Sahara is rich in resources, and it is understood Morocco is taking advantage of this. One particular resource that is being mined without the consent of the Saharawi people is phosphate. Two of the three remaining companies in the world to buy this disputed phosphate from Morocco are NZ companies. Australia, Canada, America - all have pulled out of this trade in the hope that the referendum, called for in 1991, can take place. So the Saharawi people can choose their independece. in Part IIII we hear from two different people in Aotearoa with solutions as to how we could use less phosphate - and therefore not rely on a trade that extracts the resource from a country where human rights abuses are taking place.

Kay Baxter is from the Koanga Institute. They have long worked to save heritage food plants, including vegetable seeds and fruit trees as well as being leading practitioners, researchers and teachers of bio-intensive gardening and nutrient dense food production. Now, they are also encouraging a shift to 'regenerative' farming, rather than 'degenerative' - a process which requires major nourishment of soil through fertiliser products. You can find some simple explainers on regeneration here. Kay indicates that pastoral farming has had a huge effect on the way the eco system is connected, leading to poor soil health.

Clare Bradley is the research co-ordinator at Agrisea, a company that works with seaweed to provide nutrients to the agriculture sector. When Lillian first contacted Agrisea, Clare said "farmers in NZ are being oversold Phosphorous products, in-fact over 50% of NZ Dairy Farms tested are over the “target range” for Olsen P (a measurement of plant available P)". So, in actual fact, we might not even need to be important that much phosphate? One of the reasons given by one of the NZ companies that does so was that NZ requires so much phosphate it is harder to source it from places other than Morocco/ Western Sahara - because theirs is the largest supply in the world. Lillian wanted to understand how seaweed could act as a supplement, as well as what other benefits seaweed brings to the world. 

Both Kay and Clare disagree with the sourcing of phosphate from Morocco, but also see the solutions to our ever worsening environmental and climate issues in more research, and the understanding of how our ecology worked before the links were broken. Lillian spoke with both of them to understand the movement that is very much occuring of its own accord to shift away from this reliance on phosphate. 

This is Clare's full interview. 

 

To find the other parts in the series, you can listen to them here:

Part I

Part II

Part III

The Wire with Lillian: December 4, 2019

The Wire with Lillian: December 4, 2019 The Wire with Lillian: December 4, 2019, 100.98 MB
Wed 4 Dec 2019

On Dear Science with AUT’s Allan Blackman we are talking meteor’s and testing kids in reading, math and science.

And we are finally returning to our conversations about phosphate from the Western Sahara, today we are hearing solutions from two separate people here in Aotearoa about how people can move away from using so much phosphate. We hear from Kay Baxter from the Koanga Institute, and Clare Bradley from Agrisea

The Tuesday Wire; December 3, 2019

The Tuesday Wire; December 3, 2019 The Tuesday Wire; December 3, 2019, 106.16 MB
Tue 3 Dec 2019

Good afternoon and welcome to The Wire podcast for Rātū Tuesday, the 3rd of December, Hakihea.  

On today's show we had; 

Lillian Hanly, who was waiting for the bus along Symonds St last month when she came across some phantom billsticker panels with comics in them. They were very easily recognised as Toby Morris comics who Lillian is a fan of. As she had plenty of time waiting for the bus she had a read of it. Turns out it was actually a story about the way young people with access needs experience the city, and the information had come from research done by Massey University. Karen Witten is a Professor of Public Health at Massey University and her email was on the final panel. Lillian reached out to her to find out more.

This week on Green Desk, Mitch speaks Cawthron Institue’s Dr Susie Wood who is leading
the Lakes380 Project. Currently Lakes380 is the largest undertaking of data collection on
Lakes done in New Zealand possibly the world, making use of the best technology in the
world. Mitchell and Susie discuss the scale of the project and the processes involved with
such a large undertaking. To being Mitch asks Susie to explain what Lakes380 is.

We also talked to Splice's Gareth Fa about creating space for intercultural dialogues and interactions. We also talk about the upcoming Global Active Citizens Annual Marketplace on December 12th and all the work that has gone into it. 

We also spoke to Simplicity Kiwisaver fund about their release of what we believe is Aotearoa's first Te Reo Māori Kiwisaver document. We touched on the document itself, as well as the road to its creation and the interactions between the finance world and Te Ao Māori. 

Thank you to every one who spoke to us today. 

 

 

 

 

 

Worlds Collide; Growing KiwiSaver and Finance in Te Reo and Te Ao Māori; December 3, 2019

Worlds Collide; Growing KiwiSaver and Finance in Te Reo and Te Ao Māori; December 3, 2019 Worlds Collide; Growing KiwiSaver and Finance in Te Reo and Te Ao Māori; December 3, 2019, 11.17 MB
Tue 3 Dec 2019

9fbFM spoke to Simplicity Kiwisaver fund about their release of what we believe is Aotearoa's first Te Reo Māori Kiwisaver document. We touched on the document itself, as well as the road to its creation and the interactions between the finance world and Te Ao Māori. 

A Conversation with Karen Witten w/ Lillian Hanly; December 3, 2019

A Conversation with Karen Witten w/ Lillian Hanly; December 3, 2019 A Conversation with Karen Witten w/ Lillian Hanly; December 3, 2019, 12.99 MB
Tue 3 Dec 2019

Lillian Hanly was waiting for the bus along Symonds St last month when she came across some phantom billsticker panels with comics in them. They were very easily recognised as Toby Morris comics who Lillian is a fan of. As she had plenty of time waiting for the bus she had a read of it. Turns out it was actually a story about the way young people with access needs experience the city, and the information had come from research done by Massey University. Karen Witten is a Professor of Public Health at Massey University and her email was on the final panel. Lillian reached out to her to find out more.

Creating Space for Intercultural Dialogues and Interactions w/ Splice; 3 December, 2019

Creating Space for Intercultural Dialogues and Interactions w/ Splice; 3 December, 2019 Creating Space for Intercultural Dialogues and Interactions w/ Splice; 3 December, 2019, 25.75 MB
Tue 3 Dec 2019

95bFM News talked to Splice's Gareth Fa about creating space for intercultural dialogues and interactions. We also talk about the upcoming Global Active Citizens Annual Marketplace on December 12th and all the work that has gone into it.