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Every 4 minutes: Family violence in New Zealand: December 12, 2018

Every 4 minutes: Family violence in New Zealand: December 12, 2018 Every 4 minutes: Family violence in New Zealand: December 12, 2018, 32.04 MB
Wed 12 Dec 2018

Every four minutes, a call is made to the police or a notification is sent to child services, related to a case of family violence. It is also the name given to a newly released report. It is the third of a series of researches looking into the justice system, and written by Doctor Ian Lambie, the Chief Science Advisor to the Justice sector. 

About 150,000 calls for care or protection notices are made each year,  80 percent of child and young offenders have experienced family violence, while 87 percent of young offenders aged 14 to 16 years old had previous care and protection concerns.

A third of New Zealand women experience physical or sexual partner violence, rising to 55 per cent when psychological/emotional abuse is included.

And at least one in 10 New Zealand men have experienced childhood sexual abuse.

While pointing out the statistics, Dr Lambie insists his report reveals family violence is not so much an individual issue within a couple or a home, but more so a community.

The Beat Connection with Conor: December 12th, 2018

The Beat Connection with Conor: December 12th, 2018 The Beat Connection with Conor: December 12th, 2018, 219.09 MB
Wed 12 Dec 2018

95bFM Breakfast with Mikey Havoc: December 12, 2018

95bFM Breakfast with Mikey Havoc: December 12, 2018 95bFM Breakfast with Mikey Havoc: December 12, 2018, 319.37 MB
Wed 12 Dec 2018

Today on your bFM Breakfast: Mike's playing tunes and Rob's shazaming; eels and seals are on the agenda for Mike's lesson with Rob this morning; Dr. Maria Walls is enjoying a coffee from Tess and The Other Side of Hope; Simon Bridges and Mike round up all the politics from the year; and Phil Hartnoll from Orbital catches up with Mike at the end of the show, getting excited about Splore at the beautiful Tapapakanga Regional Park.

The 95bFM Top 10: 12 December 2018

The 95bFM Top 10: 12 December 2018 The 95bFM Top 10: 12 December 2018, 218.66 MB
Wed 12 Dec 2018

Dear Science: December 12, 2018

Dear Science: December 12, 2018 Dear Science: December 12, 2018, 29.88 MB
Wed 12 Dec 2018

On Dear Science today we hear about a new, quick, way of testing for cancer, the Voyager 2's 41 year long journey into interstellar, and dangerous soya sauce "cleanses".

Can You Adam and Eve It? w/ Rob Bollix: December 12, 2018

Can You Adam and Eve It? w/ Rob Bollix: December 12, 2018 Can You Adam and Eve It? w/ Rob Bollix: December 12, 2018, 20.58 MB
Wed 12 Dec 2018

Rob is talking eels and seals and different mammals, oh and UFO's. Yep, you know, unusual occurrences. But never fear, Rob's in the know.

Madman DVD Review w/ Dr. Maria Walls: December 12, 2018

Madman DVD Review w/ Dr. Maria Walls: December 12, 2018 Maria Walls: December 12, 2018, 16.23 MB
Wed 12 Dec 2018

Dr. Maria Walls joins Mikey for a coffee in studio to talk The Other Side of Hope. Director Aki Kaurismäki's new comedy is a crowdpleaser about the friendship between a newcomer to Helsinki and a budding restaurateur. Aww. Rob reckons Maria's a fan, he can tell by her hand gestures.

Whats Up? W/ Simon Bridges: December 12, 2018

Whats Up? W/ Simon Bridges: December 12, 2018 Whats Up? W/ Simon Bridges: December 12, 2018, 19.59 MB
Wed 12 Dec 2018

Mikey and Simon catch up for their last chat before Christmas, rounding up aaall the politics this year, phew. Also talking current politics, the UN migrant pact, and the child poverty measures. And the leader of the opposition exchanges Christmas cheer with Mikey while looking into what 2019 holds for National.

Worry Week: Broadcasting Responsibilities: December 12, 2018

Worry Week: Broadcasting Responsibilities: December 12, 2018 Worry Week: Broadcasting Responsibilities: December 12, 2018, 37.45 MB
Wed 12 Dec 2018

Te Reo Māori was systematically and violently removed from the indigenous people of this country. It’s decline and near extinction was only halted and reversed by major initiatives introduced in the 1970s and 80s, struggles that were led by Māori. In 1972 a petition was presented to Parliament to promote the language. That year, a Māori language day was introduced, and in 1975 this became a Māori language week. In 1978 the first officially bilingual school opened in Rūātoki in Te Urewera. In 1982 the first Kohanga Reo opened in Lower Hutt beginning the Kohanga Reo movement which has been credited with ensuring the next generation held onto the language by immersing young tamariki in the reo. Kura Kaupapa, full immersion schooling, followed. And the first Māori-owned Māori language radio station Te Reo o Pōneke went on air in 1983. In 1985, the Waitangi Tribunal heard the Te Reo Māori claim, which asserted that te reo was a taonga that the Crown was obliged to protect under Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Māori was made an official language of New Zealand under the Maori Language Act 1987.

 

Every single one of these initiatives was fought for. It did not come easy, it did not come lightly and the resistance it faced was incredibly racist at every point. The systematic removal of the language was a conscious effort by colonisers to enforce assimilation to the English culture that was now the majority. Today, Te Reo Māori has had a resurgence but it remains at risk. Today, unlike in 1984 when Naida Glavish was demoted for saying Kia ora as a national telephone tolls operator and refusing to use only formal English greetings, today we hear Kia ora regularly in both formal and non-formal spaces. We hear it every night on the 6 o clock news. On bFM you’ll hear Ata mārie good morning, as well as ki ngā āhuatanga o Tangaroa i tēnei rā to introduce the surf report. On RadioNZ you hear all reporters signing off saying “ahau” which means I or me. As in, Ko Lillian Hanly ahau. In fact, this was the very reason for multiple BSA complaints against RNZ. So, while it has become commonplace to hear, some people still find it, funnily enough, alarming.

 

It’s here where our discussion today begins. Broadly speaking, as a broadcaster myself, I believe it is fairly straightforward to acknowledge not only an official language of Aotearoa NZ, but the indigenous language of this country. And, especially, as a Pākehā from this country, acknowledging the history and doing something about it to undo the damage which has been done, and continues to have effects. This is a personal discussion, but our identity as people’s of this country is personal, and is largely informed by the media. Who is it that we choose to be? And how are we going to achieve that.

 

Guyon Espiner is one of the presenters of Morning Report on Radio NZ. For some time now he has been weaving Te Reo into his work wherever he can. He starts the show with a mihi in the reo, and introduces himself as well. When he first started to do this, he got a lot of slack. People did not like it. At bFM we have also attempted this, and also received some slack. About a month ago, I happened to see Guyon in the supermarket and thought I’d ask whether he was interested in having a conversation on air about it all. In deferring to my tuakana, or older sibling, in the broadcaster scene I wanted to know more about his reasons for learning te reo Māori. Turns out, using te reo on the radio was a secondary priority to his life-long commitment to te ao Māori largely influenced by his family and his hope to communicate with his daughter in Te Reo.

I/V w/ Phil Hartnoll: December 12, 2018

I/V w/ Phil Hartnoll: December 12, 2018 I/V w/ Phil Hartnoll: December 12, 2018, 20.97 MB
Wed 12 Dec 2018

Phil Hartnoll, one half of Orbital, dials in to chat with Mike about how excited he is to come back to little ol' New Zealand for Splore at the beautiful Tapapakanga Regional Park. After his last show here with Underworld (very very good), you'd be silly to miss out on tickets to Splore.