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The Wire

Listen back to features and interviews from 95bFM's daily news & current affairs show, The Wire. Your hosts Jemima Huston, Mary-Margaret Slack, Lillian Hanly, Lachlan Balfour and Laura Kvigstad focus on the issues of Tāmaki Makaurau and elsewhere, in independent-thinking bFM style. Weekdays 12-1pm on 95bFM.

Gender Equality in Legal Workplaces: November 19, 2018

Gender Equality in Legal Workplaces: November 19, 2018 Gender Equality in Legal Workplaces: November 19, 2018, 6.95 MB
Mon 19 Nov 2018

The New Zealand Law Society has just celebrated 100 signatories of its Gender Equality Charter. The Charter was introduced in April of this year and aims to retain and advance women within the legal profession. The President of the Society, Kathryn Beck, spoke to Jemima about the Charter, how the Law Society plans to get every legal workplace on board, and finally how the Law Society is tackling sexual harassment as a gender equality issue. 

The Wire with Jemima: October 19, 2018

The Wire with Jemima: October 19, 2018 The Wire with Jemima: October 19, 2018, 102.8 MB
Mon 19 Nov 2018

On the Monday Wire this week, Ella is back with Under the Weather to tell us about everything climate related, including; extreme flooding, climate change protests in London, and heatwaves killing sperm. For our regular Green Party segment Jemima discusses the impact of the letting fee ban and the International Declaration on Biodiversity with co-leader Marama Davidson. Justin talks to Jason Myers from the AIDS Foundation about the 25th anniversary of the death of Eve van Grafhorst. Jemima speaks to the New Zealand Law Society President, Kathryn Beck, about the societys' Gender Equality Charter. Wrapping up with Worry Week, Damian talks to Massey University Associate Professor, Grant Duncan, about political ideologies and spectrums. 

The National Party with Amy Adams: 16th November, 2018

The National Party with Amy Adams: 16th November, 2018 The National Party with Amy Adams: 16th November, 2018, 33.05 MB
Fri 16 Nov 2018

Laura Kvigstad speaks with The National Party's Amy Adams about what's happening in politics today: from the planned re-entry of the pike river mine announced by government, a new report that shows some government departments are spending 50% more on consultancy than previous years and the new statistics that reveal the unemployment rate is the lowest it's been in 10 years. 

The Wire with Laura: 16th November, 2018

The Wire with Laura: 16th November, 2018 The Wire with Laura: 16th November, 2018, 110.08 MB
Fri 16 Nov 2018

First Up, Te Roopu Nahinara, National Party Member Amy Adams joins Laura Kvigstad to speak about the recent announcement to reopen the pike river mines.

 

Then Grace speaks with Unicef’s executive director Vivian Maiderborn about the humanitarian crisis in Yemen and what people can do to help.

Next, Sam Smith tells us all about how needles in fruit are in the news, AGAIN.

Following that, Sherry Zhang talks to Breakingboundaries volunteer Jesse Lee on advocating for the transgender community as part of transgender awareness week.

Finally,  Jennifer Rose Tamati put together a report together on cultural representation and diversity at the New Zealand Music Awards.

 

Jenn "Representing" at The New Zealand Music Awards

Jenn "Representing" at The New Zealand Music Awards Jenn "Representing" at The New Zealand Music Awards , 3.9 MB
Fri 16 Nov 2018

Producer, Jennifer Rose Tamati was media at the Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards last night - and as a result of the afterparty she has completely lost her voice. She wrote a report on diversity and representation at the awards for someone else voice. She documents the narrative of diversity and representation that is becoming increasingly prioritised at the New Zealand Music Awards. 

Biggest Humanitarian Crisis in One Hundred Years: Yemen

Biggest Humanitarian Crisis in One Hundred Years: Yemen Biggest Humanitarian Crisis in One Hundred Years: Yemen, 5.82 MB
Fri 16 Nov 2018

Producer, Grace Watson talks with Unicef’s New Zealand's executive director, Vivian Maidaborn, about the current humanitarian crisis in Yemen. The country is currently on the brink of what is being called the worst crisis in one hundred years as fourteen million people are at risk of famine as a result of a civil war that began in 2015.

Transgender Awareness Week with Jessie Lee: 16th November, 2018

Transgender Awareness Week with Jessie Lee: 16th November, 2018 Transgender Awareness Week with Jessie Lee: 16th November, 2018, 7.16 MB
Fri 16 Nov 2018

This week is transgender awareness week, and Sherry spoke to Breaking Boundaries volunteer Jesse Lee on their role within the community. Jesse is an events technician with Breaking Boundaries; a creative arts charity for queer and transgender people. There is a trigger warning for mental health and suicide, so please take care.

Lemon, Lime and Bitter Responses to E-Scooters: November 15, 2018

Lemon, Lime and Bitter Responses to E-Scooters: November 15, 2018 Lemon, Lime and Bitter Responses to E-Scooters: November 15, 2018, 22.79 MB
Thu 15 Nov 2018

Thursday Wire Host Lachlan and his producer, Oscar scoot right into the debate on the endangerment of public safety from the zesty new craze of LimeS, and the like, in Auckland. 

This day in history: 15th November, 2018

This day in history: 15th November, 2018 This day in history: 15th November, 2018, 34.95 MB
Thu 15 Nov 2018

This day in history looks at the 1985 Anglo-Irish Agreement, which took place after an intensification of The Troubles.

The Wire with Lachlan: November 15, 2018

The Wire with Lachlan: November 15, 2018 The Wire with Lachlan: November 15, 2018, 128.05 MB
Thu 15 Nov 2018

On today's Wire, Lachlan and Oscar bring you a special report on lime scooters. Community Garden looks at Hubzero, speaking with Tara. Andrew Little joins us for his regular chat, this week discussing prisoner voting rights and Pike River mine re-entry. Finally, Ben brings us This Day in History on the Ango-Irish Agreement of 1985.

Dear Science: December 12, 2018

Dear Science: December 12, 2018 Dear Science: December 12, 2018, 29.88 MB
Wed 12 Dec 2018

On Dear Science today we hear about a new, quick, way of testing for cancer, the Voyager 2's 41 year long journey into interstellar, and dangerous soya sauce "cleanses".

Worry Week: Broadcasting Responsibilities: December 12, 2018

Worry Week: Broadcasting Responsibilities: December 12, 2018 Worry Week: Broadcasting Responsibilities: December 12, 2018, 37.45 MB
Wed 12 Dec 2018

Te Reo Māori was systematically and violently removed from the indigenous people of this country. It’s decline and near extinction was only halted and reversed by major initiatives introduced in the 1970s and 80s, struggles that were led by Māori. In 1972 a petition was presented to Parliament to promote the language. That year, a Māori language day was introduced, and in 1975 this became a Māori language week. In 1978 the first officially bilingual school opened in Rūātoki in Te Urewera. In 1982 the first Kohanga Reo opened in Lower Hutt beginning the Kohanga Reo movement which has been credited with ensuring the next generation held onto the language by immersing young tamariki in the reo. Kura Kaupapa, full immersion schooling, followed. And the first Māori-owned Māori language radio station Te Reo o Pōneke went on air in 1983. In 1985, the Waitangi Tribunal heard the Te Reo Māori claim, which asserted that te reo was a taonga that the Crown was obliged to protect under Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Māori was made an official language of New Zealand under the Maori Language Act 1987.

 

Every single one of these initiatives was fought for. It did not come easy, it did not come lightly and the resistance it faced was incredibly racist at every point. The systematic removal of the language was a conscious effort by colonisers to enforce assimilation to the English culture that was now the majority. Today, Te Reo Māori has had a resurgence but it remains at risk. Today, unlike in 1984 when Naida Glavish was demoted for saying Kia ora as a national telephone tolls operator and refusing to use only formal English greetings, today we hear Kia ora regularly in both formal and non-formal spaces. We hear it every night on the 6 o clock news. On bFM you’ll hear Ata mārie good morning, as well as ki ngā āhuatanga o Tangaroa i tēnei rā to introduce the surf report. On RadioNZ you hear all reporters signing off saying “ahau” which means I or me. As in, Ko Lillian Hanly ahau. In fact, this was the very reason for multiple BSA complaints against RNZ. So, while it has become commonplace to hear, some people still find it, funnily enough, alarming.

 

It’s here where our discussion today begins. Broadly speaking, as a broadcaster myself, I believe it is fairly straightforward to acknowledge not only an official language of Aotearoa NZ, but the indigenous language of this country. And, especially, as a Pākehā from this country, acknowledging the history and doing something about it to undo the damage which has been done, and continues to have effects. This is a personal discussion, but our identity as people’s of this country is personal, and is largely informed by the media. Who is it that we choose to be? And how are we going to achieve that.

 

Guyon Espiner is one of the presenters of Morning Report on Radio NZ. For some time now he has been weaving Te Reo into his work wherever he can. He starts the show with a mihi in the reo, and introduces himself as well. When he first started to do this, he got a lot of slack. People did not like it. At bFM we have also attempted this, and also received some slack. About a month ago, I happened to see Guyon in the supermarket and thought I’d ask whether he was interested in having a conversation on air about it all. In deferring to my tuakana, or older sibling, in the broadcaster scene I wanted to know more about his reasons for learning te reo Māori. Turns out, using te reo on the radio was a secondary priority to his life-long commitment to te ao Māori largely influenced by his family and his hope to communicate with his daughter in Te Reo.

Mental Health, Cannabis & Tomorrow's Schools w/ Chlöe Swarbrick: December 10, 2018

Mental Health, Cannabis & Tomorrow's Schools w/ Chlöe Swarbrick: December 10, 2018 Mental Health, Cannabis & Tomorrow's Schools w/ Chlöe Swarbrick: December 10, 2018, 17.63 MB
Mon 10 Dec 2018

This week for our segment with the Green Party, Jemima spoke MP Chlöe Swarbrick in studio about the Green Party's mental health investigation, the third reading of the Medicinal Cannabis Government Bill, and the Tomorrow's Schools review. 

Was the Coverage of the Jami-Lee Ross Saga Ethical?: December 10, 2018

Was the Coverage of the Jami-Lee Ross Saga Ethical?: December 10, 2018 Was the Coverage of the Jami-Lee Ross Saga Ethical?: December 10, 2018, 33.49 MB
Mon 10 Dec 2018

This week the Wire Worry Week is ethical journalism and broadcasting standards. Jemima speaks to Dr Gavin Ellis about what ethical journalism is and whether the Jami-Lee Ross saga was ethically covered by New Zealand journalists. They discuss the treatment of people in power by the media, simplifying news and the status of ethical journalism in New Zealand. 

Whats on the Agenda with Greg Treadwell: December 10, 2018

Whats on the Agenda with Greg Treadwell: December 10, 2018 Whats on the Agenda with Greg Treadwell: December 10, 2018, 25.3 MB
Mon 10 Dec 2018

Worry Week this week is about ethical journalism and one of those hot phrases you’d be fortunate to come across if ever took a paper in news media is agenda setting. Agenda Setting is essentially a news agency setting up a framework for what stories we cover and what is outside of scope. At Bfm we have an agenda setting and that is why you don’t hear about the Kardasian and live up to date scores of the Ashes series. Agenda setting has been blamed for bias media with prime examples being in America such FOX News with agenda favouring Republicans whilst others outlets such as The Huffington Post favouring Democrats but I wanted to have a yarn about agenda setting in our own backyard. So I did just that, I had a yarn that spiraled out of topic with AUT’s senior lecturer Greg Treadwell, firstly asking does New Zealand have a problem with bias media.

Under the Weather: December 10, 2018

Under the Weather: December 10, 2018 Under the Weather: December 10, 2018, 12.1 MB
Mon 10 Dec 2018

Under the Weather with Ella Christensen brings you all the climate change and weather news from across the globe every Monday. This week Ella discusses flash flooding in Iraq, drought in Afghanistan and the loss of ice volume in New Zealand's Southern Alps plus more

The Big Q: What are the implications of the US-China trade war? December 10, 2018

The Big Q: What are the implications of the US-China trade war? December 10, 2018 The Big Q: What are the implications of the US-China trade war? December 10, 2018, 30.32 MB
Mon 10 Dec 2018

In 2018, the United States and China have been embroiled in a trade war with each country continuing to raise tariffs placed on goods traded between the two nations. But what exactly are Donald Trump’s tariff policies and what will be their effects? Doug Becker speaks to Iva Bozovic and Lui Hebron about the implications of the US-China trade war.

The Big Q website: www.thebigq.org 

Militarisation Lite; Expanding International Trade or Soft Colonisation? December 6th, 2018

Militarisation Lite; Expanding International trade or Soft Colonisation? December 6th, 2018 Militarisation Lite; Expanding International trade or Soft Colonisation? December 6th, 2018, 28.62 MB
Thu 6 Dec 2018

This week, Oscar talks to Professor Robert Patman about China and the USA's potential expansions in to the Pacific and how our current global trading patterns may perhaps limit a recurrence of military colonisation in the Pacific.  

Is Everybody Really Eating? Discussing Food Equity and Production; December 6th, 2018

Is Everybody Really Eating? Discussing Food Equity and Production; December 6th, 2018 Is Everybody Really Eating? Discussing Food Equity and Production; December 6th, 2018 , 24.18 MB
Thu 6 Dec 2018

Oscar has harvested yet another great group to chat to in The Community garden. This week, he talks to Nick Loosely from Everybody Eats about food production, management and equity.

A Little bit of Andy with Lachlan: December 6, 2018

A Little bit of Andy with Lachlan: December 6, 2018 A Little bit of Andy with Lachlan: December 6, 2018, 24.41 MB
Thu 6 Dec 2018

Lachlan is joined by Andrew Little to discuss referenda and his meeting with U.S. intelligence officials.